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LAMB INN KINGS LYNN index
32 KING STREET CHEQUER WARD FULL LICENCE CLOSED 1909
KINGS LYNN PETTY SESSION REGISTERS PS 4/3/1  ( August 1872 to 1902 )
WILLIAM COOPER of Kings Lynn
FREDERICK COOPER of Kings Lynn
JOHN H. KNIGHTS  
ANNE ELIZABETH KNIGHTS  
ANNE ELIZABETH WHINCOP  
Licensees :
-
-  
THOMAS HAMMOND
age 50 in 1851
& Brewer
1839 - 1851
JOHN KNIGHTS
Age 46 in 1861
& brewer
1854 - 1869
JOHN HAMMOND KNIGHTS
& brewer
by 1871
WILLIAM COX 07.01.1884
JOHN HILLMAN HOWARD 30.07.1888
EDWARD CHILVERS 06.01.1890
JAMES JARY
& merchants foreman
14.04.1890
JACOB HINDS 22.06.1896
HORACE WALTER CLARKE 28.01.1907
WILLIAM LEWIS
( Lynn Advertiser of 14.08.1907 reported that the licence had been transferred from Walter Clarke to William Lewis, but no evidence of Mr Lewis found in the Licence Registers )
12.08.1907
FRANCIS ROWE 06.01.1908
JOHN STANLEY
( arrived at house 14th December 1908 )
04.01.1909



Given as the LAMB INN & BREWERY 1861.

Address as 25 King Street in 1881.

6 day licence extended to & day 1888

At the 21st June 1909 meeting the Chief Constable ( Payne ) objected to the continued licensing of the house on the grounds of redundancy. He stated that he Exchange was 211 feet away; the Shakespeare 258 feet ; the Globe 260 feet; the Woolpack 260 feet; the Ferryboat 450 feet; and the Customs House 500 feet. There were another three houses within 500 feet. In the previous year the tenant had absconded and that left the house closed for eight months. It was a `Free House' and there were two rooms used by customers. There were also spare rooms which could be used by lodgers, but other houses in the area could do the same. The Chief Constable had no objections to the sanitation or conduct of the house. He considered that the Woolpack and the Exchange were both superior houses, but served the same class of customer.

Licence refused at Compensation Authority meetings of 21st and 23rd June 1909. Reported as an alehouse, owned by Mrs E Whincop and run by licensee John Stanley.

Referred for Compensation 08.02.1909
Offered for sale by auction 22nd July 1909.
( along with the KINGS HEAD and the attached Knights Brewery. )

` All that FREEHOLD DWELLING HOUSE, formerly a Public House known as the LAMB, and being No. 32 on the east side of King Street, and containing 3 rooms on the ground floor, 3 rooms on the first floor, and 3 rooms on the second floor, with wash house, scullery, yard and outbuildings, in the occupation of Mr. J. Stanley. '

The licence of the Lamb had been deferred for compensation, and so bidding for the house started at a mere £150 and slowly rose to £220 at which point it was withdrawn from sale.
~
At the Compensation Meeting of Wednesday 22nd December 1909 it was stated that trade the owners were Charles Bristow and Walter C. Knights, trustees of the will of J H Knights.

Trade at the house was given as :-
Beer, 60 2/3 barrels at 10/- ( For 3 years = £310 )
Bottled beer, 183 dozen at 6d ( £46)
Spirits 38 2/3 gallons at 4/- ( £77 )
Wines 2 2/3 gallons at 7/6 ( £10 )
Minerals 156 dozen a year at 6d ( £39 )
Rent £10 at 18 years
Depreciation of fixtures £7/10/-.
Giving a total 10 year value of £669/10/-
Value of property without licence was £150/15/-
Total claim was £518/15/-

Licensee Stanley said that in the 9 months he had been trading at the house he had sold :-
60 barrels of beer, 183 (dozen pint) bottles of beer and 46 gallons of spirits.
The valuer, Mr Miles, said that converting the house to a private dwelling would cost £34/10/- and the rent would be £14pa. Since the valuation, the house had been sold for £200. His valuation was £185.

The committee offered £400, which was accepted with 10% going to the tenant.


Licence extinct 07.06.1910