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In 1815,
The Commercial Hall Wine Company of London, offered through their agents, Mr. J. Woodrow of Norwich and T. & W. Manning of Foulsham. :-
Dry Cape Madeira 40s Per dozen  
Red Madeira 46s "  
Crusted Red Madeira 56s "  

1812 Port Wine

48s "  
Second quality Port Wine 44s "  
Curious high flavoured Port Wines 50s "  
Old Roriz Port 66s "  
Fine Sherry 52s "  
East India Sherry 60s "  
Most Curious West India Madeira 68s "  
East India Maderia 90s "  

In December 1900, the British Medical Journal contained an article on the contamination of beer with arsenic.
Samples of beer had been tested on 12th November 1900 and arsenic was found in the product of a particular brewery.
It was deduced that for reasons of economy, glucose was used in the brewing process in order to use less malt. This gave a gain of some 4s to 6s a barrel.
The production of glucose involved boiling maize, starch or very common cane sugar with sulphuric acid, the acid was neutralised with chalk, forming a white participate of sulphate of lime, which was strained off.
Arsenic was present in some supplies of sulphuric acid, but it was possible to get the pure acid.
It was said that the operations of the Foods and Drugs Act should extend to the analysis of glucose and brewing sugars.
However, it was not necessary to use such glucose or sugar at all, except for cheapness. Brewers should go back to using Malt and Hops.


The Norwich Public were informed that there was no chance of poisoned beer being brewed in the good old city, but glucose was then used more or less extensively by most public brewers. It would be more satisfactory to farmers and most beer drinkers if all beer was made solely from malt and hops.

 



            

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